Fixing Dual Boot Time Discrepancy Windows-Linux

Are you experiencing time discrepancies between Windows and Linux in your dual boot setup? This article provides solutions to fix this issue and synchronize the time between the two operating systems.

Understanding Time Differences in a Dual Boot System

When running a dual boot system with Windows and Linux, you may encounter time differences between the two operating systems. This can be due to the way each system handles the system time and the differences in how they interpret the hardware clock.

One way to fix this time discrepancy is to make sure both Windows and Linux are set to use the same time standard. In Windows, open the command prompt as an administrator and enter the following command:

w32tm /config /syncfromflags:manual /manualpeerlist:time.windows.com /reliable:yes /update

For Linux, you can use the timedatectl command to set the system clock to UTC:

timedatectl set-local-rtc 0

It’s also important to check the BIOS settings to ensure that the system clock is set to UTC rather than local time. This can vary depending on the motherboard and BIOS version, so consult your hardware documentation for specific instructions.

By syncing the time standards and configuring the system clock to UTC, you can minimize time differences between Windows and Linux in a dual boot system.

Automatic Time and Date Configuration

To automatically configure the time and date in a dual boot system with Windows and Linux, follow these steps:

First, make sure that both operating systems are set to use UTC time in the BIOS. This will ensure that the system time is consistent across both Windows and Linux.

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Next, in Windows, open the command prompt as an administrator and enter the following command: “bcdedit /set {current} useplatformclock true”. This will ensure that Windows uses the system’s real-time clock for timekeeping.

In Linux, use the systemd tool to configure the time and date settings. Open a terminal and enter the following command: “timedatectl set-local-rtc 0”. This will configure Linux to use UTC time for the system clock.

After making these changes, restart both operating systems to apply the new time and date configurations.

Resolving Incorrect Time Display in Windows

  1. Check the time zone settings
    • Open the Control Panel and select Clock, Language, and Region.
    • Click on Date and Time and then Change time zone.
    • Make sure the correct time zone is selected and click OK.
  2. Synchronize the system clock with an internet time server
    • Open the Date and Time settings as described above.
    • Go to the Internet Time tab and click Change settings.
      Open the Date and Time settings as described above.
Go to the Internet Time tab and click Change settings.
    • Check the box for Synchronize with an internet time server and click Update now.
  3. Reset the Windows Time service
    • Open Command Prompt as an administrator.
    • Run the command net stop w32time to stop the Windows Time service.
    • Then run the command net start w32time to start the service again.

Resolving Incorrect Time Display in Linux

Linux terminal window

To resolve incorrect time display in Linux when dual booting with Windows, you can use the following steps. First, open a terminal in your Linux distribution. Then, use the following command to check the current status of the system clock: timedatectl. Look for the line that says “RTC time” and note whether it shows local time or UTC.

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If the RTC time is set to local time, you will need to change it to UTC. To do this, use the following command: timedatectl set-local-rtc 0. This will configure the system to use UTC for the real-time clock.

Next, you will need to update the Windows registry to ensure it uses UTC for the system clock. Open the Windows registry editor and navigate to HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESYSTEMCurrentControlSetControlTimeZoneInformation. Create a new DWORD value named “RealTimeIsUniversal” and set its value to 1.

Finally, reboot your computer and check the system clock in both Windows and Linux to ensure they are displaying the correct time. This should resolve any time display discrepancies when dual booting between Windows and Linux.

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